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Of Castles and Bridges

The islands of Great Britain and Ireland are crammed with historic monuments from different time periods, reaching from pre-antiquity (Stonehenge) to the modern era (Shard in London). Many interesting sights though were built in medieval and early modern times (St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland, picture 1 and Culzean Castle, Scotland, pictures 3, 5 and 7) or in the time of industrialisation (Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol, England, picture 2, Menai Bridge, Wales, picture 4 and Britannia Bridge, Wales, picture 6). Some impressions.

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A Tale of two Cathedrals

The cathedrals of Salisbury and Winchester are masterpieces of Gothic architecture in England. Usually I don’t mix styles within one series of photographies, though for this one I decided otherwise because some of these shots need the contrast and clarity of black and white while others demand for colour and light. As these buildings themselves offer stark contrasts to the modern world they are situated in today so do this pictures with one another highlighting different perspectives of this wonderful architecture.

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Bath: The Abbey of Light

The Abbey of bath is a prime example of the Pendicular Style of Gothic architecture in England. Another would be the Cathedral of Gloucester. Medieval churches tend to be very dark and somewhat sinister. The Abbey of Bath though is different. The light coming through the beautiful stained glass windows is flowing through the building, giving interesting accents and tones.

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Discovering the English Seaside: Brighton

Before it was discovered by English royalty Brighton used to be a little fishermen’s town. It all changed in the 19th century when the railway was built and the people of Britain were getting accustomed to the concept of vacation. That’s when Brighton pier was built with a length of over 500 Meter and people began to take sunbaths at the beachfront. New hotels were built for the masses and also the royal family needed a new home. So the famous John Nash built the Crystal Palace, heavily inspired by Indian architecture. Today the town is visited by Britons but even more by foreign language students, who spent part of their vacations in the former fishermen’s town. The palace is a museum now, presumably Brighton got to crowded for the Royals.

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Discovering Wrocław

The city of Wrocław is the historical capital town of the region of Silesia. A prosperous land in the center of Europe close to Bohemia. The town changed its affiliation several times. Founded by a Czech duke in the 10th century it later became part of the first Polish state and a political center of the Kingdom. In April 1241, during the First Mongol invasion of Poland the city was abandoned by the inhabitants and burned down for strategic reasons. Later it was repopulated by German settlers and became part of the German region of Silesia. After the 2nd World War and the westward shift of the borders Wrocław again became Polish. The city always was open to different ethnicities and languages though. It is one of the most visited places in Poland and welcoming to tourists from around the world.

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