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Travelling Fuerteventura

Travelling Fuerteventura you discover a mostly barren and dry land, but still there is a lot going on. The goats for example, roaming many parts of the island and providing milk for one of the culinary specialities here, goat cheese. Also there are beautiful old windmills to find and if you dig deeper the nature become more and more diverse with sandy beaches and more mountainous regions. It’s worth it to travel to the inner part of Fuerteventura as well, as enchanting as the coast often is.

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Views on the Promenade of Nice

The Promenade d’Anglais in the french city of Nice is one of the oldest urban beachfronts in the world. In English the name translates to Promenade of the English, because beginning of the early 1800s mostly British nobleman and aristocrats came here to spend their winter vacations in the warmth of the mediterranean. Later first hotels were built at the sea and a walkway at the coast came into being. The pictures were shot in February 2019.

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Island of Strong Winds

The island of Fuerteventura is well known for the strong winds hitting it frequently and making for strong waves. These circumstances were not very favourable to seafarers but are very welcome today to many birds living on the island and to the surfers visiting it for the waves. In fact the name of the land itself Fuerteventura points to this natural phenomenon as it means nothing else than strong wind.

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Dusts of Fuerteventura

Ashore of the Sahara in the Atlantic Ocean there is a group of islands called the Canaries. They belong to Spain and are renowned for their mild weather and beautiful nature. One of these islands is called Fuerteventura. Due to its proximity to Africa and the Sahara the weather here is quite dry, it almost never rains, and the landscape is shaped to a large degree by dunes and deserts. Often dusts sweep across the island and make for interesting moods.

Shot in November 2018

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Land of the Clansmen

For centuries Scotland used to be the land of the Clansmen. The country was divided and governed by families like the MacDonalds, Camerons or MacKenzies. All of which had their own tartans, traditions and allegiances and were interlocked in a fight for influence and wealth. What they had in common was a deep connection and history with the land they occupied and an immense pride to be fierce fighters and survivors of the north. It was seldom though that they agreed on anything politically, it needed an outside force – a common enemy – to gather the concurring clans like in the wars led by national heroes like William Wallace (his monument is seen in the last picture), Robert the Bruce or lastly Bonnie Prince Charlie in the 18th century. That enemy of course was England. After the shattering battle of Culloden in which the Scottish forces lost against the English king the history of the clan-ships ended. Though their traditions and history can be seen all over the country – the spirit of fierce warriors and the deep connection to their native land can be felt and is still there.

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